CoLab Design Fiction

Being "smart" has become one of the most difficult global issues in 2050

 

Emotions are now quantifiable with wearable 5.0

“The saddest aspect of life right now is that science gathers knowledge faster than society gathers wisdom” – Isaac Asimov   Illustration created by Joon Kang

“The saddest aspect of life right now is that science gathers knowledge faster than society gathers wisdom” – Isaac Asimov

Illustration created by Joon Kang

Wearables have been contributing to advancements in the healthcare industry for the past thirty years now. In 2050, no one dies at 80 years of age anymore. Instead, grandparents’ parents live together with their grandchildren’s children.

Beyond their initial contribution, wearables have become an integral part of everyone’s daily life. They are a medium to connect with friends and coworkers. Wearables are how you get information and how you create and save your most important memories.

Advanced wearable devices – the so-called Wearables 5.0, which covers clothes, contact lenses and shoes – have taken control over our emotions. Your eye movements, perspiration, blood flow, glucose levels and body temperature are tracked with high precision and quantified into emotional values. These wearable devices can measure an individual’s emotions more precisely than a human instinct can and have begun to dictate people's emotional reactions. 

People no longer appreciate the value of ambiguity in relationships at schools, offices, or even social gathering places. They want immediate answers to everything they deal with, from communication to romantic relationships. Emotions are now quantifiable, and every relationship has become predictable and tends to be short-term. Being "smart" has become one of the most difficult global issues to tackle in 2050, challenging educational institutions and corporations to resolve the issue by 2070.

The public school system no longer has the power and function it once had and corporations have invested trillions of dollars to create a new school system. The mass-production education model that taught children how to think like advanced computers was shown to be a failure in an AI-driven industry. Being a straight-A student requires more than just being “smart.” It’s about listening and connecting, understanding and empathizing, supporting and solving.

With a high demand for the wisdom of the elder generations, a group of older people – all born between the 1980s and the 2000s – has started a nonprofit school to foster an individualized educational experience based on the liberal arts. Recently launched, the curriculum invites multi-generation families to teach students the importance of human contact, and history of love and relationships, helping them truly feel who they are and how they are different from machines. The highly personalized face-to-face education focuses on empathy, curiosity and creative problem-solving to explore the power of the human being behind machines and remind them that humans can achieve greater things when they trust each other.